Hand Painted Mug | Vintage Catrina Mug - Zenwaro

Vintage Catrina Mug

An artisan crafted mug that will most certainly be the center of attention during coffee break! Boring mass-produced coffee mugs move over! Our hand painted Vintage Catrina Mugs radiate authenticity! Vibrant orange background with the Vintage Catrina hand painted in center of mug. Lead free paint designed and crafted in conjunction with our fair trade artisans from Guanajuato Mexico.

Capacity | Dimensions.
8 ounces | 4.5"h x 3.5"diameter x 4.5"depth (with handle).

The Artisan Process Behind Creating Unique Ceramic Vessels.

Made from real "lead free" terra-cotta that is thrown and sculpted by hand and kiln fired with protective glaze. Every mug is twice baked in a high-fire kiln at 1200* - 1500*F the 2nd bake is done in with protective glaze finish. This traditional terra-cotta and kiln firing method will hold the temperature of your hot beverage longer than normal mugs crafted from porcelain. Lead free paint and ceramic, safe to hold liquid or food. Handmade by skilled fair-trade artisans. Safe for microwave, dishwasher safe(top shelf preferred), oven safe. Hand-thrown ceramic and high fire glaze is very durable and will not erode or fade, nor easily scratch.

A Folk-Art hero From Mexico.

The "Vintage Catrina" artwork hand-painted on each mug is adapted from José Guadalupe Posada (the father of the Catrina). ”La Calavera Catrina" was originally sketched in 1888 by one of Mexico’s first & most infamous satirical cartoonist José Guadalupe Posada.
Born in a small town located in the state of Aguascalientes, Mexico on February 2, 1852. As a boy Posada was educated by his older brother Cirilo, who was a “campasino” school teacher of sorts. Cirilo taught his younger brother how to read, write, and draw. This small but significant bit of education would prove to be a critical asset to Posada as he matured to become a Mexican political printmaker and engraver. Posada’s work has influenced many Latin American artists and cartoonists because of its satirical acuteness and social engagement. He used skulls, calaveras, and skeletons to make political and cultural critiques.



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